About Boréale › Team

David

Originally from “back east”, David came North many years ago and has definitely caught the Yukon bug. His summers are divided between the Yukon and Alaska, where he works for Parks Canada as an interpreter for the historic Chilkoot Trail. If Gold Rush history piques your interest, David is your man. We think he is a true Yukoner at heart, because come autumn he is as exhausted as the rest of us from spending every waking moment of a Yukon summer out riding a bike, climbing rocks or hiking up mountains. Best known trick? Showing up at Yurtville with a box of some new Alaskan beer to share!

Our Team

Anthony

Anthony

Guide

David

David

Guide

Isabel

Isabel

Guide

Kate

Kate

Guide

Sam

Sam

Guide

Sylvain

Sylvain

Guide

Thoughts on Sustainability

As you approach the headquarters for Boréale Mountain Biking, you will notice a few subtle differences that set us apart. In place of the usual “Parking Area” sign, you will see “Welcome to Yurtville”. Instead of a paved parking lot, you will find a large bicycle rack. Solar cells indicate our belief in other solutions than traditional energy sources. Our entire operation is as low impact as we can be. In fact, at the end of each season Yurtville is completely dismantled and the property is returned to its natural state.

Sustainability plays an integral role in everything that Team Boréale orchestrates. Right down to the practice of hiring local staff members as we know they contribute to the long term health of the communities we live in. We believe in giving more by using less. And guess what? It really is that simple.

Tread smartly; tread lightly. We welcome you to explore the Yukon with our fantastic team!

In the Press

Pinkbike

Pinkbike

Online, October 2013

Outside

Outside

Item, March 2013

Bike Magazine

Bike Magazine

Article, Fall 2012

Canadian Cyclists

Canadian Cyclists

Article, April 2012

Explore Magazine

Explore Magazine

Article, March 2012

Outside

Outside

Article, February 2011

Ride Guide TV

Ride Guide TV

Video, August 2010

Yukon North of Ordinary

Yukon North of Ordinary

Article, Summer 2010

The Globe and Mail

The Globe and Mail

Article, May 2010

NSMB Magazine

NSMB Magazine

Articles, Feb/Mar/Apr 2010

Vélo Vert

Vélo Vert

Article, October 2009

Outer Edge Magazine

Outer Edge Magazine

Article, August 2009

Mountain Biking UK

Mountain Biking UK

Article, 2007

FAQ

What kinds of trails should we expect? What skill levels are required?

With approximately 700 kms/500 miles of trails surrounding Whitehorse, there are trails for every skill level, from beginner to advanced. If you are interested in seeing the local landscape on a scenic cycle trip or are an avid mountain bike rider looking for the ‘next’ destination to ride, we can satisfy any group!

I am a beginner. Will I enjoy a tour with Boréale?

You bet! All of our guides are certified International Mountain Bike Instructors and love showing new riders a few tips and tricks to increase the enjoyment of their ride! True beginners can benefit from a short lesson and then feedback on the trails, all the while experiencing first hand the amazing networks that we have to play on!

What equipment should I bring?

We recommend you bring your usual biking gear: a helmet, a hydration pack, gloves, cycling shorts, etc. If you are renting or packing light, we do provide helmets and water bottles. We rent Norco Fluid full suspension mountain bikes as well.

What is the group size of the weekender package?

Maximum group size is 6 people per weekend. We try our best to match skill levels. If there is an obvious difference in skill level between two groups we will offer separate guides. If you have more than 6 in your group, let us know, we are flexible folks. Our custom packages are yours to fill with as many as you would like.

What’s the best time of year to come?

We are open year round, but our mountain biking trips run from the beginning of June to the end of September. September the riding is still great, but you also get the bonus of fall colours in the mountains and potential northern lights.

What makes Yukon riding unique?

The sheer amount of cross country trails we have and the distance that they cover. You can ride one trail for an hour, or make an 8 hour trip without doing the same trail twice. It is a little ridiculous (in a good way of course!) – there are so many trails around Whitehorse due to First Nation traditional trails, animal trails, Gold Rush days stampeders... and of course fat tire enthusiasts! We are lucky to have 3 different paid trail crews working hard to maintain and create our trail networks around Whitehorse and Carcross. It is extremely rare for local mountain bikers to bike on anything other than super fun singletrack!

What sort of weather should we expect?

You can expect all kind of weather from 10°C to 30°C and it's likely to be sunny. It never usually rains for long if it does happen to get wet. The nights and mornings are usually cooler and the days are pretty warm around 20°C, perfect riding temperature.

What type of gear would you recommend both in the saddle and for apres riding?

I usually ride in shorts and a short sleeve jersey but depending on weather I will carry a long sleeve jersey in my pack. For the après-riding I would bring a hoodie and pants, as the temperature will drop a bit at night.

Where do we stay over night when doing a multi-day package?

Our all inclusive packages are based out of our 16 acre property and lodge, situated between Whitehorse and Carcross. On site we have bedrooms with private bathrooms and balconies, and two bedroom yurts with a shared washroom facility. Unless stated, all meals are included in your trip package.

What sort of wildlife might we encounter?

It is possible to encounter black or grizzly bears, coyote, wolf, lynx, caribou, moose… But chances are slim we will see anything. We are lucky to live in a place where animals have freedom to avoid human contact. The Yukon is a huge place – why would they hang out around us?

How are the bugs/mosquitoes?

The rumours of northern bugs are highly exaggerated, especially in the areas that we will be riding. However, you will likely see mosquitoes but mostly at night between 9-11pm.

What might a typical day of meals be like?

We have fantastic chefs in our midst! Vegetarian food is available and meat options will be local – caribou, moose, elk. Fish will be halibut or Arctic Charr. All food is gourmet and prepared just for you. If you have any other allergies or food preferences, please let us know and we will accommodate. You will have a large delicious breakfast, lots of snacks, a big lunch, snacks, big dinner, and more snacks. We promise you won’t go hungry!

Are there other things we should try and experience when we aren't in the saddle?

There are lots of things to do in the Whitehorse area. We recommend a Yukon Brewing tour, visit to the Midnight Sun coffee roasters, check out some local businesses on Main Street, the Thursday night farmer’s market to name a few options. Some of the best things to do here involve scenery and just taking in the vastness that is the Yukon. Lots of alpine hikes, canoeing, kayaking, swimming in lakes, walking by the river: Remember, the days are long!

Bring a bathing suit for a dip in the Yukon River?

Sure, and if it really hot, there is a lake nearby the yurts where the locals go for a dip.

Should I bring my own bike or rent?

We recommend riders to bring their own bikes. It will make your riding vacation that much more enjoyable when you are on a bike you know well! That being said, we do have Norco Fluid full suspension bikes for rent.

What kind of bike is best to bring?

We ride Norco Fluids, light bikes with 5 and 5 inches of travel and it’s the perfect bike for around Whitehorse. That being said, you could easily ride a hardtail on most of the trails.

Affiliation

Adventure Travel Trade Association
International Mountain Bicycling Association
Norco
Ryders Eyewear
Schwalbe North America
Syncros
Yukon Wild